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Study MRI Physics

ReviseMRI.com is designed principally as a revision aid, but may also be used as an educational resource. Contents include: detailed Q&A, web-based animated tutorials, interactive learning tools, and links to resources for further reading with nearly every Q&A posed, both in common textbooks and online.

Textbook Reviews

book
MRI From Picture to Proton

MRI From Picture to Proton
authors: McRobbie, Moore, Graves, Prince; 2nd Ed., 406 pages

MRI From Picture to Proton is one of the best first texts for learning the basics of MRI. This is because need-to-know theory forms the main flow of the book, whereas advanced and more difficult concepts are contained in shaded boxes to provide a resource for students who need (or are ready for) these more challenging issues. This formatting is a great asset to the book; deciding what is important to learn and what is acceptable to leave out is very difficult for newcomers to a subject. Harder concepts may be left out for later, or even left out completely.

The separation of basic and advanced materials also makes the book an ideal tool for advancing your knowledge of a particular topic in MRI theory. You'll find the relevant pages, recognise the stuff you already know, and build on your knowledge with more difficult or advanced concepts. This is true whether you're a physicist, radiographer or radiologist in training. It is an excellent book to "dip into" to find out about a particular topic or to answer a question.

The title "Picture to Proton", really only applies to the first half of the book, in which the first questions faced by those working in MRI are dealt with first (image contrast manipulation, parameter optimisation). Image creation and basic MR theory then follow. The second half of the book tackles advanced applications such as MR angiography, cardiac MRI, in vivo spectroscopy, and a number of other topics including quality assurance and fast imaging techniques. A brief revision of mathematical concepts required is included in an appendix.

If you're new to MRI and you want only one book, this may be the right one for you.

Available at Amazon.com / Amazon.co.uk.
[The page number references to this book on this site currently refer to the 1st edition.]


book
Q&A in MRI

Questions and Answers in MRI
authors: Elster, Burdette; 2nd Ed., 333 pages

Questions and Answers in MRI seems to provide answers to specific questions when no other textbook on my shelf can. It may be that the Q&A format means that information sought is simply easier to find, but I have found this book to be an invaluable resource for learning the basics of magnetic resonance imaging. Written (in the first instance) by a radiologist, the answers to questions neatly tie together often disparate aspects of MRI theory. Disjointed and confusing topics are dealt with neatly and concisely. Sometimes brief one-to-two page summaries of a topic or question can be much more valuable than lengthy, detailed materials, and this book fills that need over a wide range of topics.

No topic which is addressed by Questions and Answers in MRI is treated half-heartedly. Though answers to questions rarely run into three sides of a page, the material is scientifically robust, and difficult concepts are not shirked. This is a great strength of the book. The book covers most topics which will interest those learning the basics of MRI, as well as some advanced issues such as diffusion and perfusion imaging, clinical applications of fast scanning techniques.

The Q&A used in the book are not listed in the contents which is a surprising omission, but this is a minor gripe, because the index included at the back of the book is comprehensive and relevant.

Although the structure of this book is not a systematic treatise of basic MRI theory, it is an excellent shadow to the basic-MRI-physics book of your choice.

Elster's work is now updated and available online at MRIquestions.com.

Available at Amazon.com / Amazon.co.uk.


book
Handbook of MRI Pulse Sequences

Handbook of MRI Pulse Sequences
authors: Berstein, King, Zhou; 1st Ed., 1017 pages

This book is an advanced, in-depth treatise of MRI theory, and seems set to become a classic. The list of pulse sequences alluded to in the title does not start in earnest until Part V on page 575. Before this is a wealth of quality study materials regarding the components of MRI pulses sequences (e.g. adiabatic RF pulses, spatial-spectral RF pulses, gradient lobe shapes, motion-sensitising gradients etc.), the mathematical processes involved in MR imaging (e.g. the Fourier transform is treated in depth, bandwidth and k-space sampling, real-time imaging, BRISK, TRICKS etc.), and practical aspects of MR imaging (e.g. triggering, gating, navigators). All this before the conventional gradient echo pulse sequence is introduced! Recent advanced techniques are also discussed, such as PROPELLER and VIPR. Parallel imaging techniques such as SENSE and SMASH are covered in detail. A detailed index is included.

Rigorous mathematical treatment of topics has been included in many places. Indeed, its primary audience is scientists and engineers. Others may benefit too, though a basic knowledge of MRI physics is assumed. If you're looking for an advanced MRI physics textbook, this one is a serious contender for your cash (it's my first choice).

"I believe that no MRI developer or user can read this book without learning more about the field, as I have."
Paul C. Lauterbur, shared Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2003 for discoveries concerning magnetic resonance imaging.

Available at Amazon.com / Amazon.co.uk.


book
MRI The Basics

MRI The Basics
authors: Hashemi, Bradley; 3rd Ed., 400 pages

MRI The Basics affords the reader a fairly fast introduction to MRI physics, and has proven useful in my own experience in understanding the effects of changing parameters such as field-of-view on image quality.

This book does not cover more recent advanced techniques as well as other textbooks, though it does get as far as fast imaging pulse sequences. This will be a good thing for some readers and a bad thing for others. The 3rd edition begins to address some more recent MR methods (covering parallel imaging, cardiac MRI and MR spectroscopy). However, the main focus of the book -- what it does very well -- is provide a comprehensive introduction to image creation and standard pulse sequences.

Available at Amazon.com / Amazon.co.uk.
[The page number references to this book on this site currently refer to the 1st edition.]


book
MRI Physical Principles and Sequence Design

MRI Physical Principles and Sequence Design
authors: Haacke, Brown, Thompson, Venkatesan; 1st Ed., 914 pages

Haacke & Brown et al have produced a fairly self-contained study resource in their large textbook on MRI principles. Classical and quantum mechanical approaches to MRI are covered, signal detection and acquisition is discussed, on through to image creation and image artefacts, SNR, image reconstruction methods, steady states, k-space trajectories, flow issues, MR equipment issues, and much more. In all of the topics addressed, a more stringent and extensive mathematical treatment may be expected when compared with other MRI textbooks. As a result, this book is for undergraduates in physics or engineering as a minimum level of prerequisite experience.

I have found that MRI Physical Principles and Sequence Design has occasionally been the only book which covers a particular topic in sufficient depth, when studying the basics of MRI at an advanced level, if you get my meaning. However, the book can be hard to "dip into" to answer a question or query; the apparently computer generated index often has me checking a number of pages in the book before finding the clearly relevant section of the text. But this is not a great flaw. The book is coherent and effective if it is studied in a linear fashion, which is required for the advanced understanding of MRI physics.

Available at Amazon.com / Amazon.co.uk.


book
Spin Dynamics

Spin Dynamics
author: Levitt; 1st Ed., 686 pages

Spin Dynamics is one of the few books to introduce a quantum mechanical description of MRI without mixing classical and quantum mechanical approaches. Particularly helpful is the fact that it assumes nothing about the reader's knowledge of quantum mechanical nomenclature and notation. Although the learning curve throughout the book is steep, it makes difficult concepts accessible and provides diagrams and analogs for conceptually challenging phenomena. This may seem impossible (quantum mechanical descriptions with accessible analogs or diagrams), but Levitt seems to avoid pitfalls by clearly explaining what his diagrams do not communicate as well as what they represent.

Though the book is really for an NMR audience, the first few chapters may prove invaluable to MRI physicists serious about understanding the quantum mechanical basis of the signal they know and love!

Available at Amazon.com / Amazon.co.uk.


book
The Physics of Clinical MR Taught Through Images

The Physics of Clinical MR Taught Through Images
authors: Runge, Nitz, Schmeets; 2nd Ed., 232 pages

The strength of this book is how easy it is to quickly review an MRI subject or technique. It is very practically oriented, and would be useful to radiographers, as well as scientists looking for physics information. Each topic is usually two pages long, with enough information to remind you of what you already know, or give you the basic physics overview very quickly. The number and variety of topics covered is extensive. A view of the contents pages is recommended to appreciate this. Whilst other structured textbooks contain information on a topic scattered across the book, The Physics of Clinical MR Taught Through Images allows the reader immediate confidence in their basic physics perspective of a method. Some of the manufacturer affiliations of the authors comes through in the book, but this does not detract significantly from its value; it will benefit users of any clinical MR system.

Available at Amazon.com / Amazon.co.uk.

Reviews by D. M. Higgins PhD.

 
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